Time to write, Time to blog

I haven’t written a blog post in many months. I did however complete one novel and begin another.

So the question I’m asking is if authors of years gone by didn’t spend their time on social media, why was that such a bad thing?

I already know the answer to my own question. The market for publication was very different to the current one. But I still wonder why writers today need to make sure that they spend time on all the many social media platforms before they have even published one iota of work.

Again, I know the answer to that question. Writers need to create a profile online so that they are known before they are famous.

But surely, in order to be a writer, you need to produce the work first, a good finished draft to showcase yourself. Wouldn’t that be better than tweeting about it?

Anyway, I’m digging a hole for myself here because I know the answer to all of this.

– Time management

Today’s author has to be a writer and a business person, has to have a publisher’s hat on as well, also marketing and be their own agent, selling their work constantly through the current media du jour – the internet.

Perhaps the gap in my blog posting is just pure procrastination. (Now technically, I am producing the goods, writing wise, and that was the main reason for starting this blog, to support other writers stuck in limbo with their writing.)

Anyway, I’m back and rearing to go. So what have you been up to these last few months?

The positives of procrastination

The byline of this blog is simple ‘Writing and the art of procrastination’ and yet I’m loath to admit that I get more productive after I’ve procrastinated a bit. After all, we’re supposed to be productive all the time, you know, bang out the 5000 plus words of our target before lunch. Every day. Simples. Not.

This blog post from Positive Writer says it all brilliantly about embracing procrastination, labelling procrastination as taking a break or slowing down but without the guilt trip because a break refreshs you for the next writing session, slowing down reduces stress, gives your mind time to mull over the next scene, action, word.

Here it is: Creative Flow: 8 Reasons Why Procrastinating is Better than Working

 

Getting over the initial fear

Getting over the initial fear of putting pen to paper, placing my fingers onto the keyboard, opening up the last draft, checking my notes, starting the corrections, adjustments, editing my work, working on the millionth (it feels like it) revision of a chapter or a scene, some days feels like the hardest thing in the world.

Knowing that the chapters and scenes that I’ve looked at and edited will work better, read better after their revisions and convincing myself to keep going because this next chapter, this next scene, after I put in the changes I’ve identified that it needs, will be better. It will sing, exactly right, exactly the way I want it to. I’m getting there.

So, today, I feel the fear, the worry inside that tells me ‘what if you are wasting your time, what if this novel is crap?’ and I try my best to ignore it, that malicious little voice, and I shout back ‘But I’ve seen it, I’ve seen the precious fragments in my writing that tell me I’m mastering this craft, I’m doing this, I can do this’.

And then I tell myself.

‘Do not be afraid. Write. You deserve to have your voice heard and your words deserve to be read.’

P.S. I feel like I’ve been editing forever…thank goodness I sorted out all the plots and subplots, this should work better now. All I have to do is keep going, with a little faith…No, with a lot of faith.